Guide to Egg Freezing Around the World

Discover your egg freezing options abroad in

🇨🇦 Canada | 🇮🇱 Israel | 🇲🇽 Mexico | 🇪🇸 Spain | 🇬🇧 United Kingdom
(more countries coming soon!)

Planned egg freezing (commonly known as elective egg freezing or social egg freezing) has grown by almost 15-fold in the last seven years in the United States, and the rest of the world is following suit. Since millennials are more global and internationally connected than ever before, women who are considering freezing their eggs are comparing clinics across borders. With a reduction in the cost in air travel and developing countries have been investing in their medical infrastructure, medical tourism has increased drastically. According to the American Journal of Medicine, in 2017, more than 1.4 million Americans sought health care in a variety of countries around the world. Reproduction-focused procedures are among the top five most common procedures for medical tourism.

As the interest and demand in international egg freezing options grows, the Freeze team decided to research and simplify the cost, laws, and things to keep in mind when considering freezing your eggs abroad. While the five highlighted countries are often the most researched by potential egg freezing patients, they aren’t your only options.

Want to request a country to be included in the next version of the Guide to Egg Freezing Around the World? Let us know by requesting the country here!

🇨🇦 Canada

Over the past four decades, Canada has experienced an increase in average childbearing age from 23.7 in 1970 to 28.5 in 2011. Additionally, more than half of all births in Canada now occur in women age 30 and older. The Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society (CFAS) is the multidisciplinary organization that provides guidelines and research for reproductive science - including egg freezing - within Canada. The Society believes that women should be provided with sufficient information and informed consent prior to pursuing planned egg freezing. According to the CFAS, the highest probability of live birth in egg freezing programs has been obtained when oocyte cryopreservation is performed before the age of 36.

Total Cost: $8,000 - $10,500 CAD
Single Cycle: $5,000 - $6,800 CAD
Medication: $3,000 - $5,000 CAD
Annual Storage: $250 - $625 CAD

Prevalence:

A report by BORN Ontario (Ontario's pregnancy, birth, and childhood registry) showed that the number of women participating in egg freezing more than doubled from 132 in 2013 to 325 in 2016, though this report did not specify if egg freezing was done for elective or medical purposes.

Popular Clinics:

For Citizens:

Elective egg freezing is not covered by governmental health plans in Canada.

For Non-Citizens:

  • Some clinics will not accept non-Canadian citizens as egg freezing patients.

  • A public health screening is required for all egg freezing patients.

  • In order to transfer the eggs outside of Canada, patients need to contact the courier and be aware of the US-Canada customs regulations.

  • Foreign egg freezing patients must have international health insurance in order to be seen.

Resources:

🇮🇱 Israel

Israel has established itself as a popular location for IVF, offering Israeli citizens with unlimited procedures for up to two babies until women are 45 years old. With this law, it is no surprise that Israel has a fertility rate of 2.9 children per family. A survey published in 2002 by the Journal of Human Reproduction Update reported that 1,657 assisted reproduction procedures per million people per year were performed in Israel, compared with 126 in the United States. Although Israel’s assisted reproduction industry is growing, egg freezing (often referred to as egg conservation in Israel) was not offered until 2012. The Reproduction and Abortion Law and Policy established by the Ministry of Health in 2012 limits eligibility of elective egg freezing based on your age and the number of permitted extractions. The Israeli Fertility Society (ILA) is the organization in Israel responsible for clinical research and innovations within the field of fertility treatment and its committee members are very active in governmental policies on fertility issues.

Total Cost: $6,500 - $8,500 USD
Single Cycle: $4,000 - $5,760 USD
Medication: ~$1,000 USD
Annual Storage: $200 - $2,660 USD

Prevalence:

According to the ILA, Israel has experienced a dramatic increase in women pursuing elective egg freezing. According to the figures of Ayala – the Israel Fertility Association, since the process was approved for implementation in Israel, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of women who choose planned egg freezing. In 2011, less than 100 women underwent the procedure, while in 2016, there were about 1,600 cycles of egg freezing for the purpose of preservation for non-medical reasons.

Popular Clinics:

For Citizens:

Elective egg freezing is not covered by governmental health plans in Israel.

Laws:

Elective egg freezing for women pursuing fertility treatments and/or preservation for non-medical purposes are limited to those aged 30 to 41. Women are also limited for egg retrieval to no more than four extractions or until they reach 20 eggs, whichever comes first. This includes if the extracted eggs are being frozen. Frozen eggs may be stored and used until the age of 54.

For Non-Citizens:

  • In Israel, a total of twenty centers are approved for egg freezing under Article 4 of the Public Health Regulations. Clinics and centers not included under Article 4 are not legally authorized to offer elective egg freezing.

  • The majority of fertility clinics belong to the same network known as Clalit.

Resources:

🇲🇽 Mexico

Mexico is well known for being a popular destination for medical tourism. Elective egg freezing in Mexico has recently become popular due to its lower costs compared to the United States. Unlike some countries, Mexico offers assisted reproduction services to all patients regardless of their relationship status. The Mexican Association of Reproductive Medicine (AMMR) is the organization responsible for producing and studying fertility literature as well as its application to practicing clinics. Egg freezing laws are regulated under the Mexican Ministry of Health which oversees licensure to regulate Mexican clinics.  

Total Cost: $3,500 - $5,500 USD
Single Cycle: $2,600 - $5,000 USD*
Medication: ~$3,000 USD*
Annual Storage: ~$700 USD*

* Note: The majority of the Single Cycle prices at Mexican clinics includes medication and multiple years of storage.

Prevalence:

The actual number of of egg freezing cycles performed in Mexico is currently unknown, though assisted reproduction and fertility clinics are seeing an increase in patients requesting information and traveling from the United States for elective egg freezing.

Popular Clinics:

For Citizens:

Elective egg freezing is not covered by governmental health plans in Mexico.

For Non-Citizens:

  • Egg freezing patients can choose to pay in installments, but the entire payment must be paid in full prior to the procedure.

  • The majority of egg freezing packages at Mexican clinics include medication and multiple years of storage.

Resources:

🇪🇸 Spain

Spain has a longstanding history of being Europe’s most popular country for assisted reproduction and “destination IVF” due to its less-restricting laws. Many European citizens have been traveling to Spain for reproductive services, including egg freezing, because the overall cost is lower when compared to other European countries. Assisted reproduction in Spain is regulated by the Assisted Reproduction Technology (ART) Law. There are currently no restrictions by law on age for egg freezing or length of storage.

Total Cost: 3,500 - 5,000 EUR
Single Cycle: €1,995 - €3,130 EUR
Medication: €1,200 - €1,500 EUR
Annual Storage: €240- €500 EUR

Prevalence:

The actual number of egg freezing cycles in Spain is unknown. Considering the country is a hotspot for egg donation and assisted reproduction within Europe, it is becoming more popular for European women interested in elective egg freezing to travel to Spain for their treatment. The Spanish Fertility Society is responsible for publishing statistical data on assisted reproduction prevalence.

Popular Clinics:

For Citizens:

Elective egg freezing is not covered by governmental health plans in Spain.

Things to Note For Non-Citizens:

  • The majority of Spanish clinics do not offer financing to non-Spanish citizens or residents. If patients have a Spanish banking account, there is a greater chance to be approved for financing.  

  • In order to transfer eggs outside of Spain, the final approval depends on the Spanish government, a process that can take up to several weeks.

Resources

  • The ART LAW 14/2006 of 2006 was published to regulate assisted reproduction.

🇬🇧 United Kingdom

The United Kingdom has established itself as an egg freezing research authority with easily accessible and free information provided by the Human Fertilisation & Embryology Authority (HFEA). The HFEA is an independent regulator of fertility treatment in the UK involved in research amongst licensed fertility clinics. They recently published the first pilot national fertility patient survey in 2018 that provides further understanding of patient experiences and impacts. Fertility clinics within the UK must abide by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act (HFE), which states that clinics wishing to participate in egg freezing must be licensed and undergo inspection by the HFEA. The HFE currently restricts egg storage for elective freezing up to ten years. The British Fertility Society (BFS) is another organization within the UK that actively promotes research, quality practice, and regulation in fertility treatment.

Total Cost: £4,000-4,450 GBP
Single Cycle: £3,000-4,100 GBP
Medication: ~£2,000 GBP
Annual Storage: £250-350 GBP

Prevalence:

Results from the 2016 HFEA report show that 1,173 egg freezing cycles were completed in 2016, compared to only 29 in 2001.

Popular Clinics:

For Citizens:

Planned egg freezing is not covered by governmental health plans in the UK (otherwise known as the National Health Services, or NHS).

Laws:

Within the UK, there is currently an egg storage law that only allows eggs to be stored for up to ten years. After the ten years is up, any remaining frozen eggs are to be destroyed. Only those that are freezing for medical purposes (such as a cancer diagnosis) are permitted to store their eggs past the ten year mark. However, there is currently a petition in the UK to abolish and/or extend the ten year storage limit.  

For Non-Citizens:

  • Some clinics require their patients to go through counseling.

  • No financial payment plans are offered to international patients.

Resources:

HFEA provides a list of of all regulated Fertility Clinics in the UK.


The Freeze team hopes this Guide to Egg Freezing Around The World was helpful in outlining popular international clinic options. Freeze was not compensated by any of the clinics to be included in the report. As this is a general overview, our team encourages you to consider potential additional costs, understand the country’s best research practices, and research the quality of these clinics to make a well-informed, thoughtful decision on if, when and where you choose to freeze your eggs.

Did you freeze your eggs abroad? We’d love to hear about your experience!
Send us a note or connect with us on Twitter or Instagram.


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Sidonia Rose Swarm is the co-founder of Freeze. (A well-deserved shout out & BIG thank you to Brenna & Mathias for helping compile all the research for the Guide to Egg Freezing Around the World.)

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